GIVE YOURSELF A HOLIDAY GIFT: REASSESS YOUR CAREER

Where did the year go?  We feel like the dog days of summer just ended (summer, what summer?) and now we can’t go into a store without hearing Bing Crosby sing White Christmas. As the countdown to 2011 is in full swing, instead of focusing solely on buying gifts and decorating your tree — or lighting the menorah or kinara, what have you — now is an opportune time to take a good look at your career and assess where you want it to go in the New Year.  Are you vying for a new job?  More responsibility in your current position?  An entirely new career?

Here are a few key things you can do between now and the end of December to take stock of your career situation:

1. Check out the market. Speaking from personal experience, we’re actually hiring right now (and know of lots of others doing so as well) so it’s not true, as many people think, that the job market dies down between Thanksgiving and New Year’s.  In fact, we’ve seen some really stellar talent out there at this time of year and, because many people take a break from their search over the holidays, there’s also less competition. Check job listing sites but don’t rely solely on them.  Ask around — often the best jobs are the ones that aren’t advertised and, if someone is hiring towards the holidays, he or she will be eager to snap up a strong candidate who is ready to start as soon as possible.   No one wants to kick off the New Year without a full staff in place.

2. Spread some holiday cheer. If you’re not finding open positions in your field, try to book some friendly informational interviews at companies that interest you.  Things tend to slow down for people in December so they might actually have the time to squeeze in a quick coffee with you (or, if not, you can at least get on their calendars now for after the New Year).  Offer to come to their office or a convenient location for them — and be sure to pick up the check.  If you can’t get in to meet people face-to-face, send a nice note or small token to wish them a happy holiday season.  Be creative so you stand out from the pile of “Season’s Greetings.”  We just received a package of salted caramels in a small corrugated cardboard box with a hang tag that we absolutely loved — it was low-cost and simple but memorable (and delicious!).

3. Look back and look forward. December is a great time to analyze your accomplishments over the past year and set goals for the year ahead. Write them all down — having a record will come in handy when you want to ask for a raise or promotion in your current job, outline your assets for a potential new job or create a roadmap to follow as you move forward.  Ask yourself: Did I achieve what I wanted to this year?  What could I have done better?  What am I most proud of?  What do I hope to accomplish in 2011 and how will I tackle it?

How do you view the end of the year — as a time to get some rest and focus on friends and family, or an opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been and where you’re going?  Let us know your thoughts in the comments section.

WHAT’S YOUR (RESUME) STORY?

It’s not news that workers today feel the need to jump around to get the money, experience or accolades they desire (and feel that they deserve). According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median years a person stays in one job is 4.1 years (2008) and an average person will have to have 7-10 jobs over their careers.

Given that today’s workplace narrative has shifted from a loyalty tale to one where varied experience is king, your resume should be crafted to reflect who you are and where you want to go.  And, perhaps more importantly, when you walk into an interview, knowing how to share your resume story will be crucial to locking in any new opportunity.

Do you flit or sit?

FLIT: If you’re a “Butterfly” (i.e. candidates that have a long list of positions on their resume, each held for only a year or two), it begs the question: If the candidate is hired and the time (and money!) is spent on training, will he/she stick around long enough to make it worthwhile for the company?

SIT: On the flip side, maybe you’re more like a “Beagle” — someone who has been at the same company for years, who has demonstrated loyalty and dedication.   The one watch out: You may be seen as set in your ways or not as tapped into what’s happen in the current marketplace.

Whoever you are, when walking into a job interview, you should be prepared with a strong story about why you did/did not make the jumps:

  • Have you stuck it out at your company for a long time? Talk about qualities like loyalty and commitment and the opportunities that have been offered to you.  Come ready to share stories about your various victories and accolades earned.
  • Do you move around every few years? Focus on sharing the evolution of your experience and what that varied background can add to a potential employer.  Underscore your interest in finding a place to learn and grow for a while.
  • Are there gaps in your work experience?  It’s not unusual in today’s economy to have some gaps.  Maybe there were layoffs or shifts in directions that created the need to separate from your employer.   No worries, just make sure you’re prepared to talk about alternative experience (e.g. volunteering, school, externships) and that you can explain simply/easily why you and the companies in question parted ways.

Tell us, do you relate more to the butterfly or beagle?  What’s the story that you’ll tell to a potential employer about your work experiences?   Share your thoughts with us on Facebook or Twitter (@bestpublicist).