Serena’s Olympic Victory Celebration: Learning from The Dance that Became a Distraction

 

Serena busts a move (http://www.nbcolympics.com/video/tennis/highlights-serena-williams-dancing-after-winning-gold.html)


Likely it was simply a moment of unbridled joy — as she told Access Hollywood, “A good moment for her”–  but Serena Williams’ golden accomplishment became tarnished when she spontaneously broke into a  “C-Walk” victory dance — moves tied to gang life in her home state of California.

Of course, the various pundits and people around the blogoshere rushed to weigh in:

It was embarrassing.”

It was just a dance (and the criticism smacked of racism).”

It was inappropriate.”

It was cool.”

No matter what the meaning or intention, the result of the action was the same: It inadvertently shifted the focus from her incredible achievement to a less than stellar image.

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A Surprising Secret to Success

Don’t forget to show gratitude every day for what you have.

This is a refreshingly positive little article on Inc.com about what leads to true success in a career — and it’s not what you may think.  It’s about gratitude.  We’re all so stressed and so busy (present company included!) that most of us don’t take enough time to stop and be thankful for what we have, what we contribute to our companies, clients or customers or for the people around us who support us (spouse, loved ones, business associates, childcare professionals).

There are so many people out there without jobs or in jobs they hate that it’s worth setting aside a few minutes a day to appreciate what you have. We know we will.

The Good, The Bad and the Scary: How Your Digital Profile Impacts Your Job


The Web still continues to be, in most minds, the Wild West (the WWW, if you will). Constantly changing, filled with danger and opportunity, you never know where the next shot will be fired and who will be the next sheriff in town. So, with that in mind, we share with you the WWW’s impact on your job search — Spaghetti Western-style: The Good, The Bad and the Scary:


THE GOOD: Getting Information and Access Is Easier Than Ever.

A lot has been said about companies using social media to identify and screen potential employees, particularly the newly minted set.  But now, the proverbial mouse is in the other hand, according to a recent survey — nearly 28 percent of college students plan to seek employment using LinkedIn. Slightly more than seven percent plan to use Facebook, a platform formerly seen as primarily social.

It’s that blurring of the lines that is actually putting the soon-to-graduate set in the driver’s seat; instead of waiting around for that recruiter to reach out, they’re using digital tools to identify and, ideally, land their ultimate gig. For them, the wealth of online information helps them cull through options to identify companies that align with their values and goals. All is fair game, and a strong digital presence is one way for employers to attract the best and brightest to their ranks.

THE BAD: The Internet never forgets.

Another survey — this one from the Society of Human Resource Management — shows that more companies are recruiting via social networking. Not surprising that almost 100 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn.  What might be news is that Facebook is the next most utilized Social Media site (58%), followed by Twitter (42%).

In addition to being careful about what you post, it’s a good practice to give pause before giving access. In other words, think twice about to whom and to which sites you give access to your Facebook profile. You are who you “hang” out with — one and offline; make sure you know the friends who have access to your profiles and that everyone you are connected to is carefully considering what they post to your wall or the photos you’re tagged in.

THE SCARY: Like it or Not, Everyone is A “Public Figure”

As we’ve said before – Google is your first resume. In Be Your Own Best Publicist, we caution that everything you say (or post) can and will be used against you. Run a red light? Cameras are there to catch it. Fall in a fountain accidentally? Someone is filming on a flip cam and uploading to YouTube before you dry off. In this day and age, when walking on the street can inadvertently turn you into an overnight celebrity, everything — did we say “everything”? — is on the record and privacy has basically gone out the window.

Unfortunately, unlike the of-the-moment celebrity or sports star, that white hot spotlight doesn’t translate into a lucrative endorsement deal or the ability to borrow that $1 million pair of Harry Winston earrings for your company’s annual awards ceremony.

 

So remember, your digital profile is your lasting legacy.  Pay attention to your posts, your posse and your privacy settings to stay on the right track.  Giddyup – and good luck!

What other things worry you about the impact of the digital realm?  Share with us here, on Facebook or on Twitter.


ASKING FOR A PROMOTION OR RAISE? DO IT FOR THE RIGHT REASONS

For those of you old enough to remember, there was a Smith Barney commercial in the 80s featuring the actor John Houseman that said, “We make money the old-fashioned way – we earn it.”

While the 80s were wrong-minded in so many ways (leg-warmers and Steve Guttenberg, anyone?), the times did tout working hard as a means to achieving one’s professional goals.

Flash-forward to the “00s” or “Aughts” or whatever you want to deem the last decade. Of late, we’ve encountered quite a few young souls who thought it was perfectly acceptable to ask for a raise or promotion for personal reasons, not because they had earned it by working hard, taking on more responsibility, exceeding expectations or being a true asset to their company, boss, coworkers or clients. Instead, they believed themselves deserving of more money or recognition at work because they were, for example, facing a rent hike; feeling frustrated or ashamed that friends of the same age had reached a higher rung at work; believing that he/she should receive more than the cost-of-living increase everyone at the company was getting (but giving no concrete explanation as to why they deserved more), and — our favorite — it was embarrassing for his/her parents that their golden child hadn’t yet been promoted.

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