How to Make Sure Your Job Search is More Treat Than Trick

Halloween is a holiday that has as many advocates as it has opponents.  But whether this year finds you donning a costume or simply reminiscing about those October 31sts of your youth, there are key professional lessons to learn from the age old All Hallows Eve:

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News You Can Use: First-Time Job Seekers May Be Struggling for a Reason

In this week’s New York Post @Work section, there’s a great cover story on how many young job seekers may be ruining their chances of getting hired because of various errors they make during the interview process. We’ve blogged about this several times before but it’s imperative that applicants learn to stand out to potential employers — and we don’t mean in a bad way!

Some of the common gaffes covered in the New York Post article include:

  • Spelling/grammar mistakes: It’s amazing how frequently job candidates submit written materials — whether resume, cover letter, writing sample or thank you note — riddled with errors. Even if you use the spell check function on your Blackberry or computer (and our guess is that most don’t!), read it again aloud before sending it and, even better, get someone else to review it first. If job candidates aren’t careful enough to check for mistakes during the interview process, they’ll only get worse once you hire them.
  • Dress for the job you want: We spend a whole chapter in our book Be Your Own Best Publicist on personal style and how to dress appropriately for an interview. We share advice from loads of fashion experts and they all agree that candidates need to be well-groomed, polished and stylish and not be tone-deaf when it comes to the industry or position for which they’re interviewing. For example, if you’re going for a job in a creative field, you may want to dress a bit more fashion-forward (but still no flip-flops, people!) than if you were applying to work in banking or the legal arena.
  • Come prepared: This seems like a no-brainer but endless job candidates apply for positions without doing the proper research on the company, the industry and the person with whom they land an interview (if they get in the door). Having just come from college, where students must do research and study in order to succeed, it’s shocking that recent graduates don’t realize that they need to put the same effort and preparation into a job search, particularly in a tough market where there are fewer jobs available.
  • Keep it professional: An interviewer is not your friend; if you’re lucky, he or she may be your future boss. So don’t get too chummy or casual during your conversations. Don’t discuss your personal life or ask about theirs. Don’t post about your interview on Facebook or Twitter. Don’t curse (yes, people have done this during our interviews!). And please don’t use emoticons in your follow-up email.

Many Gen-Yers suffer from a bit of culture shock when they enter the workforce after college; in most cases, just being “good enough” is simply not going to cut it. And any sense of entitlement certainly won’t either. Young job-seekers need to go above and beyond in order to make a good impression on potential employers. (We share lots of advice on how to do so in our book.) Because as the New York Post article ends, “Not everyone gets a trophy in the real world.”

News You Can Use: Fighting the Battle of Sexes When It Comes to Self-Promotion

In the “Workstation” column of The New York Times‘ Business section this past Sunday, Phyllis Korkki notes that “women need to prove themselves multiple times” in order to move ahead in the workplace, whereas men have much more latitude.

According to experts interviewed for the piece, we are still living in a world where being aggressive is a compliment when referring to a man and an insult when it describes his female counterpart. Executive coach Peggy Klaus adds that women spend more time praising others’ contributions than their own because self-promotion makes them uncomfortable.

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News We Can Use: Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. RIP Steve Jobs.

Last night came the news that the world had lost an extraordinary visionary, Steve Jobs.  The man responsible for everything from the iPad/iPod/iPhone to Buzz Lightyear  has moved from infinity to the beyond.

No doubt the tributes will be far and wide – highlighting his entrepreneurial prowess and his unparalleled creativity; his philanthropic drive and attention to detail; his strong spirit and unique support of burgeoning talent. There’s already so much on the books about his leadership, impact and innovation.

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News We Can Use: A Simple Way to Stand Out (AKA Jimmy Fallon Is Onto Something)

This week, the Postal Service shared that the average household gets one personal letter about every seven weeks. That’s a significant drop from 1987, when people received a letter about every two weeks. Makes sense, given that cursive writing itself may be headed for extinction; to date, 41 of the 50 states have dropped it from their teaching curriculum.

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On Our Radars and In Our Readers: Week of October 2

Whether for the government, a cause or  yourself, marketing in all forms is bubbling up in conversation this week.  Here’s the latest:

Thanks again to Gennifer Delman — virtual intern/future magazine editor/head of Hofstra’s Ed2010 chapter — for compiling the top PR/marketing news of the week!

See any other headlines/trends you want to share?  Post it in the comments or send it to us at BestPublicist (at) gmail (dot) com.